Lynn Hume Stuart ’60: Quiet Strength

Quiet Strength

(Left to right) Bill Stuart III, Anne Stuart, Ken Stuart, Lynn Hume Stuart ’60, Bill Stuart, and John Stuart gather to celebrate Lynn’s Alumnae Achievement Award.

(Left to right) Bill Stuart III, Anne Stuart, Ken Stuart, Lynn Hume Stuart ’60, Bill Stuart, and John Stuart gather to celebrate Lynn’s Alumnae Achievement Award.

Even while battling cancer, Lynn Hume Stuart ’60 portrayed the strength and commitment that had defined her life full of service to the College and her community.

“She was very brave,” Marie Woody Harris ’57, Lynn’s longtime friend, said shortly after Lynn died on Nov. 2. “Lynn had a sense of humor. I never saw her flustered. She did things in a quiet, elegant way. She had a lot of good friends, and I’m proud to be one of them.”

Those attributes won Lynn a place in the hearts of many people, and they are the same qualities that earned her an Alumnae Achievement Award in September. “Elements of Lynn’s tireless and thoughtful leadership, and her practicality, are found throughout the pages of yearbooks and the history of the College since she stepped foot on campus as a first-year,” Randolph President John E. Klein said at the award ceremony.

Originally from Texas, Lynn and her husband, Bill, returned to Lynchburg for his work in 1964, affording Lynn the opportunity to maintain a close relationship with the College.

In her address upon receiving the Alumnae Achievement Award, Lynn explained how attending R-MWC prepared her for the challenges and opportunities of life. She mentioned three specific gifts: research, writing, and leadership opportunities.

“I was not much of a leader in high school. I lost the only election I ever entered,” she said. “But college offered many opportunities and on-the-job training for leadership roles.

“Lynn had a sense of humor. I never saw her flustered. She did things in a quiet, elegant way. She had a lot of good friends, and I’m proud to be one of them.” Marie Woody Harris ’57

These experiences, in turn, gave me self-confidence to take on leadership positions later in life.” She pointed out that, while she had never had a full- time career, these lessons aided her in raising her sons and engaging in volunteer opportunities. Lynn served in leadership roles for numerous organizations in the Lynchburg area.

Lynn served the College in various capacities, including 10 years on the Board of Trustees and more than 30 years as a docent at the Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College. She was on the Presidential Search Committee in 1986 and also served as the Alumnae Association president form 1988–1991.

“Getting the right people into the right jobs is one of the things that I see as important to leadership,” she said in an interview before the Alumnae Achievement Awards. “If I’ve been able to do that on a few occasions, then that’s great.”

Lynn was motivated to serve because she wanted to contribute to the community, including the College, her church, and her city, Marie said. “Lynn would want people to be loving and caring, She certainly set that example.” Marie added.

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